aphrodisiac cranberryThe aphrodisiac power of cranberry

Crimson cranberry is a tiny emblems of autumn, particularly in the American northeast. And cranberries are a staple at the Thanksgiving table.

They are among North America’s native fruits and were originally named “craneberries” by the Pilgrims, who thought the plants’ blossoms resembled the bill of the Sandhill crane.

By the Nineteenth Century, the popularity of cranberries took off in Europe. And farmers began to plant the American fruit throughout Britain and Scandinavia.

Thanks to Ocean Spray, cranberries are now enjoyed year-round in juice blends, the Cape Codder cocktail and, my personal favorite, dried and served like tart raisins. However, they’re better known as an aid in fighting urinary tract infectious than as a tool in amorous pursuits.

Nutrition for sexual health

But these glistening, red globes are packed with nutrients beneficial to sexual health. For starters, cranberries are rich in Vitamin C. Vitamin C is clinically proved to keep sex glands running. They are also a source of Vitamin A, important for reproduction. (Vitamin A is also key for a healthy immune system.) In addition, they aid the circulatory system. And cranberries are a good source of fiber, (great for keeping you long, lean and ready for action).

A relative of the blueberry, the cranberry is an excellent source of antioxidants. (In a recent study, cranberry juice rated among the five highest juices for antioxidant activity. In fact, it was right up there with grape juice and red wine). To reap the most antioxidant rewards, choose the most ripe berries you can find. A product of the ripening process is something called NNC’s, (nonfluorexcing chlorophyll catabolytes). These NNC’s are powerful antioxidants that protect the plant, (not to mention the human body, once the NNC’s are ingested).

Look for the brightest, sexiest red berries and start pumping up your libido with these little rubies of fall.

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